While I tend to like my philosophy to read more like Quine, Sellars has his high points. There is a certain appeal to the metaphor and grand sounding claims in his writing, e.g., the space of reasons stuff and the manifest image paper. Consider the last paragraph from his Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind:
“I have used a myth to kill a myth — the Myth of the Given. But is my myth really a myth? Or does the reader not recognize Jones as Man himself in the middle of his journey from the grunts and groans of the cave to the subtle and polydimensional discourse of the drawing room, the laboratory, and the study, the language of Henry and William James, of Einstein and of the philosophers who, in their efforts to break out of discourse to an arche beyond discourse, have provided the most curious dimension of all.”
Can anyone still write like that?

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