In my browsing of Amazon, I came across something kind of exciting. There are two new collections of Quine’s work coming, edited by Dagfinn Follesdal and Douglas Quine. They are Confessions of a Confirmed Extensionalist and Other Essays and Quine in Dialogue. The former appears to be split between previously uncollected essays, previously unpublished essays, and more recent essays. The latter appears to consist of a lot of lighter pieces, reviews, and interviews. Amazon doesn’t seem to have the tables of contents available yet, but they are available at the publisher’s page, here and here. Both look promising for those that are interested in Quine. I’m curious to read Quine’s review of Lakatos in the latter volume. It could be wildly disappointing, but it would be nice to see Quine’s reaction a philosophy of math that is so at odds with his own. [Edit: In the comments, Douglas Quine points out that more detailed information for the new volumes, as well as information on other centennial events, are up on the W.V. Quine website.]

The other Quinean thing is a question. Is there anywhere in Quine’s writings where he discusses the role of statistics and probability in modern science? It seemed like there could be something there that could be used as the beginning of an objection to Quine’s fairly tidy picture of scientific inquiry. (This thought is sort of half-baked at this point.) Over the holidays I couldn’t think of anywhere Quine talked about how it fit into his epistemological views. It seemed odd that Quine didn’t ever discuss it, given the importance of statistics in science, so I’m fairly sure I’m forgetting or overlooking something. There might be something in From Stimulus to Science or Pursuit of Truth, but I won’t have access to those for a few days yet. [Edit: In the comments Greg points out that Sober presented a sketch of a criticism along the lines above in his paper “Quine’s Two Dogmas,” available for download on his papers page.]

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